Lab publication for new way to measure neighborhoods: Street egohoods

Defining “neighborhoods” is challenging for researchers. In prior research lab members Dr. Hipp and Dr. Adam Boessen proposed a novel measure, termed “egohoods”, that captures the area surrounding a particular block (based on straight-line distance). This new study extends this idea by explicitly incorporating the street network into the measure. This approach measures street egohoods based on the local street block, and then all adjacent streets. A second definition includes all street blocks one or two streets away from the focal block. We believe that these are plausible “neighborhoods” since residents can easily come into contact one or two street blocks away from their own street block. The approach is demonstrated using data for the Southern California region, we find that this measure of immigrant neighborhoods often exhibits a robust negative relationship with levels of crime.

You can access the article by Dr. Young-an Kim and Dr. John R. Hipp in the Journal of Quantitative Criminology entitled, “Street Egohood: A New Perspective of Measuring Neighborhood Based on Urban Streets.”

Get it here: https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s10940-019-09410-3

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Lab publication on new measure of immigrant neighborhoods

Studies typically measure immigrant neighborhoods based on the composition of the residential population. However, although ethnic businesses are an important component of immigrant neighborhoods, scholars often do not consider them when constructing measures of these neighborhoods. This study proposes a novel way to mesaure immigrant neighborhoods that combines information about the residential population, the presence of ethnic businesses, and the spatial distribution of these measures for creating what we term immigrant ethnic activity space (IEAS). Using data for the Southern California region, we find that this measure of immigrant neighborhoods often exhibits a robust negative relationship with levels of crime.

You can access the article by Dr. Young-an Kim, Dr. John R. Hipp, and Dr.  Charis Kubrin in the Journal of Criminal Justice entitled, “Where They Live and Go: Immigrant Ethnic Activity Space and Neighborhood Crime in Southern California.”

Get it here: https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0047235218303775

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Lab publication studying relationship between housing age or housing types and crime

This study introduces filtering theory from housing economics to criminology and measures the age of housing as a proxy for deterioration and physical disorder. Using data for Los Angeles County in 2009 to 2011, negative binomial regression models are estimated and find that street segments with older housing have higher levels of all six crime types tested. Street segments with more housing age diversity have higher levels of all crime types, whereas housing age diversity in the surrounding ½-mile area is associated with lower levels of crime. Street segments with detached single-family units generally had less crime compared with other types of housing. Street segments with large apartment complexes (five or more units) generally have more crime than those with small apartment complexes and duplexes.

You can access the freely available article by Dr. John R. Hipp, Dr. Young-an Kim, & Dr. Kevin Kane online first in Crime & Delinquency entitled, “The effect of the physical environment on crime rates: Capturing housing age and housing type at varying spatial scales”.

Get it here:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0049089X16307931

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New lab publication using Twitter data to measure spatial and temporal crime concentration (Online first)

You can now access an online first article by Dr. John R. Hipp, Christopher Bates, Moshe Lichman & Dr. Padhraic Smyth in Justice Quarterly entitled, “Using Social Media to Measure Temporal Ambient Population: Does it Help Explain Local Crime Rates?” The article examines the use of social media data, geocoded Tweets, as a proxy for the temporal ambient population, in testing various implications of routine activities and crime pattern theories in Southern California.

Get it here:

Using Social Media to Measure Temporal Ambient Population: Does it Help Explain Local Crime Rates?

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New lab publication on crime concentration and spatial scales (Online first)

You can now access an online first article by Dr. John R. Hipp, Dr. James C. Wo, & Young-An Kim in the Social Science Research entitled, “Studying neighborhood crime across different macro spatial scales: The case of robbery in 4 cities”. The article examines crime variation across macro-environments & micro-geographic units four cities.

Get it here:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0049089X16307931

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