Lab publication studying neighborhood social distance and disagreement in assessing collective efficacy

Whereas existing research typically treats the variability in residents’ reports of collective efficacy and neighboring as measurement error, we consider such variability as of substantive interest in itself. This variability may indicate disagreement among residents with implications for the neighborhood collectivity. We propose using a general measure of social distance based on several social dimensions (rather than measures based on a single dimension such as racial/ethnic heterogeneity or income inequality) to help understand this variability in assessments.  We use data from Wave I (2001) of the Los Angeles Family and Neighborhoods Study (N = 3,570) to aggregate respondents into egohoods of two different sizes: ¼ mile and ½ mile radii. Consistent with our expectations, neighborhoods with higher levels of general social distance have higher variability in the reports of neighboring and the two components of collective efficacy – cohesion and informal social control.

You can access the freely available article by Dr. John R. Hipp, Seth A. Williams, & Dr. Adam Boessen in Socius entitled, “Disagreement in Assessing Collective Efficacy: The Role of Social Distance”. The article examines variability in perceptions of collective efficacy among residents in neighborhoods in Los Angeles.

Get it here:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0049089X16307931

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New lab publication using Twitter data to measure spatial and temporal crime concentration (Online first)

You can now access an online first article by Dr. John R. Hipp, Christopher Bates, Moshe Lichman & Dr. Padhraic Smyth in Justice Quarterly entitled, “Using Social Media to Measure Temporal Ambient Population: Does it Help Explain Local Crime Rates?” The article examines the use of social media data, geocoded Tweets, as a proxy for the temporal ambient population, in testing various implications of routine activities and crime pattern theories in Southern California.

Get it here:

Using Social Media to Measure Temporal Ambient Population: Does it Help Explain Local Crime Rates?

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New lab publication on crime concentration and spatial scales (Online first)

You can now access an online first article by Dr. John R. Hipp, Dr. James C. Wo, & Young-An Kim in the Social Science Research entitled, “Studying neighborhood crime across different macro spatial scales: The case of robbery in 4 cities”. The article examines crime variation across macro-environments & micro-geographic units four cities.

Get it here:

http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0049089X16307931

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New publication by graduate student Rylan Simpson

On July, 17 2017, ILSSC graduate student Rylan Simpson had a journal article published in Journal of Experimental Criminology entitled, “The Police Officer Perception Project (POPP): An experimental evaluation of factors that impact perceptions of the police.” The article featured experimental research Rylan Simpson conducted for his 2nd-year project in the department of Criminology, Law and Society.

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Recent meta-analysis by Dr. Kubrin reveals immigration does not raise crime.

Read more about Dr. Kubrin’s pioneering research and views on current immigration policy here:

Immigration does not raise crime, UCI-led study finds, refuting common assumption

Read the meta-analysis article published in the Inaugural issue of the Annual Review of Criminology here:

http://www.annualreviews.org/doi/abs/10.1146/annurev-criminol-032317-092026